KASA Games Rules

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The Official Rules Governing the Scottish Highland Games for KASA

Adapted for the TCHH for Traditional Heavy Events

Revised 10/21 By Daryn Herzberg

 

SECTION I: GENERAL EVENT RULES

 

1.  Conduct of the Distance Events - Stone Putt, Weight Throw and Hammer Toss

               a.  Each competitor shall be allowed three throws in each distance event.

               b.  The competitor may start and stop their throw and it will not count as an attempt provided the implement doesn’t leave their hand and the competitor has committed no foul.  If the competitor desire to set the implement down or step out of trig area, they may do so only with the judge’s permission.

               c. In the stone putt and weight throw the measurement shall be taken to the nearest mark in the ground made by the stone or the weight, not the handle, the point which the measurement is taken from depends on the trig configuration.  In the hammer throw the measurement shall be made from a point on the inside edge of the trig closest to the center of the competitor’s stance, to the nearest mark in the ground made by the head of the hammer not the handle.

               d.  Placing shall be determined by the best legal throw.

               e.  In the event of a tie, placing shall be determined by the next best throw(s).

               f.  In the event of a tie for first place, if the above method does not determine a first place winner then additional throws shall be made to try and break the tie.  If after a maximum of three additional throws, there is still no winner then the event shall be declared a tie.

               g.  Ties for places other than first, not broken by the next best throw(s) are to be declared ties.

               h.  In the event of a tie, the points for the places shall be added together and divided evenly among the tied competitors.

               i.  At the conclusion of the competition, the winner may be given three attempts to try and set new records.  The competitor may use all, some, or none of these extra attempts.  The best legal throw shall be recorded as a new record if the old one has been broken.  Extra throws shall not be used in determining points in regard to a decathlon scoring system.

               j.  All records shall be measured with a steel tape.

2.  Configuration of the Throwing Area for the Distance Events

               a.  The Trig is to be made of wood.  It shall measure 4 foot 6 inches long and 5 ½ to 6 inches high.  Every effort shall be made to secure the trig to the ground so that it will not move during the event if a competitor steps against it.

               b.  All areas beyond the frontline (which includes all parts of the trig except the inside vertical face) and behind the backline are out of bounds and contact with any of these areas by any part of the competitor’s body during an attempt shall be a foul and count as an attempt whether the implement has been delivered or not.  Touching the ground with your hands or falling down after a throw is considered not having control and shall be called as a foul.

               c.  For the stone putt the backline shall be set at 7’6” from the inside of the trig.  For the weight for distance throw the backline shall be set 9’ from the inside of the trig.  No backline is used in the hammer toss.

               d.  In the stone putt and weight throw two trig sideline configurations are allowed.

                              i.  The box configuration has sidelines that are perpendicular to the trig and set even with its edges so that the distance between the sidelines is 4’6”.  The competitor must start with at least one foot completely within the sidelines and must finish with at least one foot completely within the sidelines.  It is a foul if two consecutive foot falls contact the ground beyond the sidelines.  It is a foul if any part of the competitor’s body other than the feet contacts the ground beyond the sidelines. Measurements shall be taken from the point at the center of the inside edge of the trig board.

 

 

                              ii.  The wing configuration has wings that extend out from each edge of the trig at a 45-degree angle for a distance of roughly 18”, the sidelines then continue perpendicular to the trig all the way to the backline.  With the exception of the leading 45-degree wings, the sidelines are parallel and not more than 6’9” apart.  All the areas beyond the sidelines are out of bounds and contact with any of these areas by any part of the competitor’s body during an attempt shall be a foul and count as an attempt whether the implement has been delivered or not.  The wings may be either painted lines or extensions of the trig board itself.  All measurements shall be taken from the point at the center of the inside edge of the trig board.

               e.  In the hammer throw, a straight trig shall be used with no sidelines.  The competitor must have at least one foot directly in front of the trig at all times during the throw and after the release of the hammer.  Neither foot shall pass the plane of the inside of the trig during or after the hammer is released.

               f.  In all throws, if the implement lands behind the plane of the trig the throw is a foul.

               g.  All records shall be measured with a steel tape.

3.  Conduct of Height Events – Weight over the Bar and Sheaf Toss

               a.  Standards similar to those used in the pole vault should be used.  Two configurations are allowed.

                              i.  Knock-off bar:  The crossbar should sit on pins that extend perpendicularly from the                                            uprights; so that if the implement hits the bar it will generally be knocked off.  If the                               implement goes over the bar, the attempt is good whether or not it hits the bar                                                       provided the bar is not knocked off the pins.

                              ii.  Fixed bar:  The crossbar is physically attached to the uprights so that if the weights hit                                the bar it will remain in position.  If the implement goes over the bar, the attempt is                                       good whether or not it hits the bar.

               b.  The distance between the uprights shall be 10’ to the inside of the uprights.

               c.  The judge has full discretion to establish the starting height and all subsequent heights.  However, it is important that all decisions concerning the height of the bar should be made in consultation with he competitors.

               d.  The starting height shall be divisible by 12”.  The bar should be raised in increments of 1’ for WOB and 3’ for sheaf until 3 or fewer competitors remain, after that the competitors may request any increment divisible by 3” for WOB and 6” for sheaf.  For record attempts only, the bar may be set at any height divisible by 1”

               e.  All measurements shall be made from the ground to the top of the crossbar at its lowest point.

               f.  The implement must go over the bar within the uprights.

               g.  A competitor shall have the discretion to commence at the starting height or at any subsequent height.

               h.  A competitor may pass any height at any time; however, a competitor who forgoes

an attempt at a height thereby forfeits the right to attempt again at that height.  Such competitor may, however, attempt that height if needed to break a tie for first place.

               i.  Three consecutive failures, regardless of the height at which such failures occur, disqualifies the competitor from further attempts except as necessary to break a tie for first place.

               j.  The winner shall be the competitor who tosses the weight or sheaf over the highest height.  Placing is then determined by the next highest height and repeated until all the places are filled.

               k.  In the event of a tie, the competitor with the lowest number of attempts at the height at which the tie occurs shall be awarded the higher place.

               l.  If the tie still remains, the procedure described above is repeated at each successively lower height until all ties are broken or all previous heights have been considered.

               m.  If the ties still remains:

                              i.  If it concerns first place, the competitors tying shall have one more attempt of the                                 current height.  If no decision is reached, the bar shall be lowered (if all have failed) or                                     raised (if two or more have cleared) by an amount determined by the judge.  The tying                                      competitors shall then make one attempt at each height until the tie is decided.  In the                                process of breaking a tie, a pass shall be considered a missed attempt.  The competitors                                     may elect to accept the tie provided all competitors involved in the tie agree.                                                  ii.  If it concerns any other place, the competitors shall be awarded the same place in the                                   competition.

               n.  In the event of a tie, the points for the places shall be added together and then divided evenly among the tied competitors.

               o.  Any passes at heights lower than the final height successfully made by the competitor shall be considered as made attempts in the determination of final placing.

               p.  Where all competitors have failed except one, that competitor is entitled to continue until he has missed three consecutive attempts at a single height.  The highest height successfully made shall be used in determining points in regard to a decathlon scoring system

4.  Measurements shall be recorded to the lowest quarter inch in all the events

5.  The ground surface on which the competition shall take place shall be as flat as possible.

6.  If an implement breaks during the throw or while in the air, it shall not count as a throw provided it was made in accordance with the rules.  In the event that the competitor thereby loses balance and commits a foul, it shall not be charged.

7.  When an implement is broken during a competition, a suitable and equal implement shall be substituted and the competition continued.  If the judge does not feel that a suitable and equal implement has been substituted, then at the judge’s discretion, the round in which the implement was broken shall be repeated with the distances originally recorded in that round disregarded. 

8.  Metal implements shall be made of metal no softer than brass, or of a shell of such metal filled with lead or other material.  If a filling is used, it must be inserted in such a manner that it is immovable.  Implements that do not conform to these requirements will be considered illegal for use or record consideration.

9.  No device of any kind (e.g. weightlifting straps) that in any way assists a competitor when making a throw shall be allowed.  Only the following are excepted:

               a.  The use of tape on the wrist, hand and fingers is allowed, however taping together of two or more fingers is forbidden.  Any use of tape to protect the hand and fingers should be cleared with the judge before the event starts.

               b.  The use of gloves are allowed in all events except for the stone putting events.

               c.  In order to obtain a better grip, competitors may use a suitable substance on their hands or gloves only.  In the stone putts, chalk may be the only substance used for grip. 

               d.  The us of toe spikes for the hammer throw is allowed.

               e.  The use of weightlifting belts and supportive wraps is allowed.

10.  A time limit of two minutes shall be applied in each individual attempt in all events.  The two-minute time limit shall begin when the judge announces the competitor’s name.  In the event that a competitor follows himself in successive attempts, they shall be allowed 3 minutes. 

 

SECTION II:  SPECIFIC EVENT RULES

 

1.  Open Stone

               Suggested weights for this event are in the range of 16 to 20 pounds for the men and 8 to 12 pounds for the women.  Because of the nature of the implement considerable variation in the weight is allowed.

               a.  The implement shall be stone or metal and as close to spherical as possible.

               b.  The stone shall be putt from the shoulder with one hand only.

               c.  At the time the competitor takes a stance to commence a putt, the stone shall touch or be in close proximity to the neck or chin, and the hand shall not be dropped below this position during the act of putting.

               d.  The stone must not at any time be brought behind the line of the shoulders.

2.  Braemar Stone Putt

               Suggested weights for this event are in the range of 20 to 28 pounds for the men and 13-18 pounds for the women.  Because of the nature of the implement considerable variation in the weight is allowed.  The same rules apply as in the open stone putt except that no approach is allowed, the competitor must make a standing throw.  The lead foot must be touching the ground at all times, except during the release of the stone the competitor is allowed to switch their feet.

3.  Weight Throw

               Standard weights for these events are 28 and 56 pounds for men, and 14 and 28 pounds for the women.  Men’s masters, novice (up to the head judge) and light weight men may throw a 42 pound weight instead of a 56 pound weight. Women’s masters, novice (up to the head judge), juniors and lightweight women may throw a 21 pound weight instead of a 28 pound weight.

               a.  The weight shall be made of metal and consist of spherical or box weight with a chain and handle attached.  The handle may be a ring, triangle or a ”D” shape.  The implement shall not measure more than 18 inches in overall length from the bottom of the weight to the top of the handle.  The official weight of each implement is total weight, including the handle.

               b.  The competitor may use either hand to throw the weight, but only one hand me be used.

               c.  Any style may be used to throw the weight as long as it is deemed safe by the judge.

               d.  The competitor may start and stop their throw provided that no part of the implement has made contact with the ground or the trig board or steps out of bounds during the aborted attempt.  If the implement has made contact with the ground or trig board or the competitor steps out of bounds after the attempt was initiated and prior to receiving permission from the judge, the attempt will be a foul.

4.  Hammer Toss

               Standard weights for these events are 16 and 22 pounds for the men, and 12 and 16 pounds for the women and juniors.

               a.  The hammer shall be spherical and made of metal, and the shaft shall be of wood, rattan or plastic.  The implement shall not measure more than 50 inches overall length from the bottom of the weight to the top of the handle.  The handle shall be either ¾” or ½” in diameter.  The official weight of each implement is the total weight, including the handle.

               b.  The hammer shall be thrown in a standing style.  Although some movement of the feet prior to the release is allowed, there shall be no approach and the competitor is not allowed to spin the body.

               c.  The competitor in the starting position, prior to the preliminary swing, is permitted to rest the head of the hammer on the ground on either side of the trig or on the trig board itself.

               d.  It shall not be considered a foul throw if the hammer touches the ground beyond the trig or the trig itself at the beginning of an attempt.  After initiating the swings, it shall be a foul if any part of the hammer touches the ground beyond the trig, top or side of the trig or the competitor steps on the top of the trig or beyond the inside face of the trig.  A competitor falling or touching the ground with any body part besides their feet during the throw or immediately afterwards has failed to show control and the throw shall be considered a foul.

 

5.  Weight Over the Bar

               Standard weights for this event are 56 pounds for men, and 28 pounds for women.  Men’s masters, novice( up to head judge) and lightweight competitors may throw a 42 pound weight instead of 56 pound weight.  Women’s masters, novice (up to head judge, juniors and lightweight competitors may throw a 21 pound weight instead of a 28 pound weight.

               a.  The weight shall be of metal and consist of a spherical or box weight with a triangle, ring or “D” handle attached.  The implement shall not measure more thank 18 inches in overall length from the bottom of the weight to the top of the handle.  The official weight of each implement is the total weight, including the handle.

               b.  The competitor may use either hand to toss the weight, but only one hand may be used.

               c.  Any style may be used to toss the weight as long as it is deemed safe by the judge.

6.  Sheaf Toss

               Standard weights for this are 16 or 20 pounds for men and 10 or 12 pounds for women.  Men’s masters, novice (up to head judge) and lightweight competitors may throw the 16 pound sheaf instead of  the 20 pound sheaf.  Women’s masters, novice (up to head judge), juniors and lightweight competitors may throw the 10 pound sheaf instead of the 12 pound sheaf.

               a.  The sheaf shall be a burlap bag filled with straw, hay, pine needles or rope.  It is recommended that two or three bags be put over each other so that the sheaf will last through the whole competition.  The bag shall not measure more than 36 inches long by 24 inches wide.  A bag smaller that this is recommended.

               b.  The toss is made using a two or three tine pitchfork with a 5 foot nominal handle.

               c.  Any style may be used to toss the sheaf as long as it is deemed safe by the judge.

               d.  Competitors may bring their own pitchfork but it is understood that any competitor may use any pitchfork on the field or sidelines that will be used in competition.

               e.  Pitchfork tines may be lubricated with WD-40 only.  No other lubricants.

7.  Caber

               There is no standard size or weight of caber, but whenever possible the caber chosen should be able to be turned by approximately ½ of the class.  A challenge caber should be of a length and weight beyond the power of all but the best competitors to turn.  The caber is to be made of wood, although metal may be substituted when deemed necessary.  It is recommended that a back judge and side judge be used.  The caber shall be placed upright by the stewards in balance, with the heavy end uppermost, ready for the competitor to make his attempt.  As soon as the competitor receives the caber and the stewards stand clear, the attempt commences.  The judge may set boundaries if they feel the ground in a certain area is not suitable for the caber to be tossed.  Safety should be a primary concern and the caber should not be too close to the spectators at any time during the toss.  The competitor must take at least 3 steps in a direction of travel to establish direction and show control and then toss the caber from where they choose, as long as it is within the judge’s boundaries.  If the competitor allows the caber to fall before lifting it off the ground, this shall count as an attempt.  If the competitor drops the small end of the caber back to the ground after having picked it up, this also counts as an attempt.  Under no circumstances shall a fixed trig or stance be used.  The caber must be judged on its landing position, not the position to which it may bounce or roll.  The caber must pass through the vertical position in order to count as a turned caber.  The vertical position is 90 degrees and it its up to the side judge to determine if the caber has passed through it, the back judge will be responsible if no side judge is used.  The “clock face method” of judging shall be used.  The caber in a perfect toss will pass through the vertical position and land with the small end pointing directly at 12 o’clock in an imaginary straight line extending from the competitor through the initial landing point and in line with the direction of the run.  A competitor must take at least 3 steps to determine direction of travel before tossing the caber or they will be judged on their last direction of travel.  An overhead view is drawn below to demonstrate a 12 o’clock toss.

 

 

 

A valid turn is when the small end of the caber passes through the vertical position and falls away from the competitor to land within the 180 degree radius, between 9 o’clock and 3 o’clock.  An overhead view is drawn below to demonstrate some turned cabers and how they are scored.

 

The direction of run is determined by the path taken once the competitor is deemed by the judge to be in control of the caber and has taken at least 3 steps to determine direction.  The competitor may run in one direction and then stop and change direction, as long as they maintain control of the caber.  If the caber lands in a 12 o’clock position pointing away from the competitor but not in a direct line with their run, then the judge must determine the competitor’s original direction of run and establish where a true 12 o’clock toss would be.  He must then five an appropriate judgment based on the amount of deviation from the line.

              

 

If the competitor does not turn the caber, then it is the responsibility of the side judge to determine the angle at which the caber was tossed with respect to the 90 degree vertical.  The side judge should be perpendicular to the competitors’  line of approach in order to make an accurate call.  A picture of a view from the side judge’s position is shown.

 

Each competitor is allowed three attempts, the best of these to count in the determination of their placement in the competition.  The order of placing shall be determined by the nearest 12 o’clock toss made by a competitor.  If the competitor did not turn the caber, then placing shall be determined by the next best attempt(s).  If this does not produce a first place winner, one additional attempt by the tied competitors shall be made.  If a winner is not determined by this additional attempt, then the event shall be declared a tie.  Ties for places other than first not broken by the next best attempts shall be declared a tie.  If the caber has not been turned after on complete round, then the judge may cut or substitute the caber.  The caber shall be cut from the large end by an amount determined by the judge.  This process can be repeated until the caber has been turned.  If the caber breaks during the competition, placing is determined by all completed rounds.  If fewer than two full rounds have been completed, and a caber of equal size and difficulty is available than all three rounds of the caber may be repeated.  If a qualifying caber is used, then any successful turn qualifies the competitor for the next caber.  A competitor shall have 3 tries at turning the qualifying caber.

 

 

SECTION III:  GENERAL RULES OF COMPETITION

1.  After each completed event, the competitor who threw first is now placed last in the next event and everybody moves up one place.  This is repeated after every event.

2.  The one-point scoring system is recommended.  In this system a competitor receives points depending on placing in each contested event, one point for a first place finish, two points for second place and so on.  The competitor with the fewest accumulated points after all of the events have been contested is the overall games winner.  If there is a tie for first over-all then the winner shall be the competitor with the most first places in the individual events.  If this does not produce a winner, then the tie will be decided on the scoring of the caber toss between those individuals.  Other scoring systems (e.g. decathlon scoring) may be used provided that the competitors are informed of the scoring method to be used before the start of the competition.

3.  A competitor must make at least one attempt in every event in order to place in an overall competition.

4.  In the interest of safety, the judge has the right to disqualify any competitor who, in the judge’s opinion, does not have the ability to complete a throw without undue risk of injury to themselves, other competitors or spectators.  The judge also has the right to disqualify any competitor who displays poor sportsmanship or engages in inappropriate conduct.

5.  The field judge in conjunction with the athletic director of a game may make on the spot rules variations to accommodate the participation of disabled athletes.  All such changes should be made with safety as the preeminent concern.

6.  The athletic director of a game may establish objective classes for that game.  Some examples are masters, lightweights, novice, etc.

7.  Calculating the point of a Caber

               Women’s Caber – Weight x Height x Taper Factor = women’s caber value

               Men’s Caber – Weight x Height x Taper Factor x .055 = men’s caber value

              

               Taper Factor = taper value/remaining length

               Taper Value = measurement from top of caber to balance point

               Remaining Length = total length of caber minus taper value

 

 

               Example Caber:  weight=70lbs,  length=18,  taper value=8.0,  remainder=10.0

                                             70 x 18 x .80(taper factor, taper value/remaining                                                                                                                                    length)=1008 for women

                                             70 x 18 x .80 x .55=554.4 for men

 

              

Decathlon Scoring the Caber:

                              For every minute of turned Caber before or past 12:00 is 0.6 points (a score of 12:10 would be deduction of 6 points from the total point value of the caber), max points deducted for 3 hours would be 108.  If the Caber does not turn and a score in degrees is awarded, use the following formula.

                              (Caber Value 108) * (degrees 100)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLASSES/DIVISIONS

 

               Mens Classes

               Professional                                      Receives Cash Prizes

               A                                                          Amateur (Top Level)

               B                                                          Amateur (Intermediate)

               C                                                          Amateur (Novice)

               Lightweight                                       Must weigh 200 pounds or under (must                                                                                     weigh in day of comp)

               Masters                                             Must be 40 yrs old or older, can be broken                                                                              down into 5 or 10 yr increments

                                                                          (example 40-49, 50-59)

               Womens Classes

               Professional                                      Receives Cash Prizes

               A                                                          Amateur (Top Level)

               B                                                          Amateur (Intermediate)

               C                                                          Amateur (Novice)

               Lightweight                                       Must weigh 150 pounds or under (must                                                                                     weigh in day of comp)

               Masters                                             Must be 40 yrs old or older, can be broken                                                                               down into 5 or 10 yr increments (example                                                                                 40-49, 50-59)

               Juniors

               1 Class boys/girls                             Must be under 18yrs old.  This division will                                                                               throw the women’s weights

 

GENERAL RULES:

 

1.  A Scottish Heavy Events competition is defined by at least 5 of the events listed in these rules.  If only 5 events are used they must be at least:

                              Caber

                              Weight for Height

                              Stone (either one)

                              Weight for Distance (heavy or light)

                              Hammer or Sheaf

 

2.  After each completed event, the competitor who threw first is now placed last in the next event and everybody moves up one place.  This is repeated after each and every event so the same competitor isn’t starting each event first.

3.  All competitors will wear a kilt.  At discretion of the AD this may be waived for novice or C class and first-time throwers.

4.  In the interest of safety, the judge has the right to disqualify any competitor who, in the judge’s opinion does not have the ability to complete a throw without undue risk of injury to himself or other competitors or spectators.  The judge also has the right to disqualify any competitor who displays poor sportsmanship or engages in inappropriate conduct.

5.  A competitor must make at least one attempt in every event, in order to place in an overall competition.  At the discretion of the Athletic Director, if the competitor does not attempt to compete in all the events then they will not receive points or awards for the individual events or the overall competition.

6.  The judge may apply a time limit to each throw if he feels it is necessary.  If the competitor does not begin the throw within this time limit the attempt will be a foul.

7.  If an implement breaks during the throw or while in the air, it shall not count as a throw provided it was made in accordance with the rules.  In the event that the competitor thereby loses balance and commits a foul, it shall not be charged.

8.  When an implement is broken during a competition, a suitable and equal implement shall be substituted and the competition continued.  If the judge does not feel that a suitable and equal implement has been substituted, then at the judge’s discretion, the round in which the implement was broken shall be repeated with the distances originally recorded in that round discarded.

9.  Gloves may be worn expect during the stones throws.  However, hammer gloves and other gloves with straps (dead lift straps) that can aid in the competitors grip or somehow give the competitor an unfair advantage are not allowed.

10.  The use of toes spikes for the hammer throw are allowed.

11.  The use of weightlifting belts and supportive wraps are allowed.

12.  Individual fingers and the thumb of the throwing hand may be taped but not fingers or thumb may be taped together.

13.  Any intentional misuse of these rules will be viewed as unsportsmanlike conduct and may result in a foul.

 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

 

Trig

The trig is to be made of wood.  The trig shall measure 4 feet 6 inches long and 6 inches tall and at least 4 inches wide.  Every effort shall be made to secure the trig to the ground so that it will not move during the event if a competitor steps against it.  Stakes should not be above the trig so as to not be a hazard to the competitor.

Throwing Area

The area behind the trig which measures 4’6” W x 7’6” D for the Open Stone and Braemar.  4’6” W x 9’ D for Weight for Distance.  Hammer area is not marked behind the trig.

 

 

Impact Area

The area in front of the trig in which the implement thrown lands and is marked.  The field marker shall mark to the front of the impact area made by the implement, not the handle, closest to the trig.

Metal

Hammer heads, Weight for Distance and Height implements shall be made of metal which could include but not limited to lead, brass or steel.  If lead is used it is recommended that it be incased in steel.  If a filling is used it must be inserted in such a manner this is immovable.

Pitchfork

A commercially produced 2 or 3 tine fork will be used that measures a nominal 5’ or less.  It may be modified to the extent of removing tines, reshaping the tines or shortening the handle.

Sheaf

A burlap bag filled with straw, hay, pine needles or rope.  It will not measure more than 24” long x 18” wide x 12” high.

 

Implements Weights and Lengths

Men's Pro, A, B, C                                    Men's Masters, Lightweights

Braemar       22-28                                        22-28

Open Stone 16-20                                        16-20

HWFD            56                                              42

LWFD             28                                              28

H Hammer    22                                             22

L Hammer    16                                              16

Sheaf             20                                              16

WOB              56                                               42

Women's Pro, A, B, C                               Women's Masters, Lightweights, Junior

Braemar           12-18                                      12-18

Open Stone      8-12                                        8-12

HWFD                28                                            21           

LWFD                 14                                            14

H Hammer        16                                            16

L Hammer         12                                            12

Sheaf                  12                                            10

WOB                   28                                            21

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR

 

               1.  It is the responsibility of the Athletic Director to announce any local events rules in writing well in advance of the games.  This announcement should be included on the games application and or on the waiver form.

               2.  It is highly recommended that the Athletic Director verify that all implements are legal before the games.  Additionally, the Athletic Director should have tools and hardware to make minor fixes to any broken implements.

               3.  When an American, North American or World Record has been broken it is the responsibility of the Judge or Athletic Director to verify that record.  The Record must be set within all rules for that event.  The implement will be weighed on a certified scale and the weight will be equal to or more than the legal weight for that implement.  In the case of the Weights for Distance, the Weight for Height and the Hammer Throw, the overall length of the implement will be measured and the length will be equal to or less than the legal length of that implement.

               4.  American records must be set by a competitor with American citizenship and may be set anywhere in the world.  Canadian records must be set by a competitor with Canadian citizenship and may be set anywhere in the world.  North American records must be set by a competitor with citizenship in North America and may be set anywhere in the world.  Any competitor anywhere in the world may set World Records.

               5.  Safety must be a paramount concern to all the organizers, judges, competitors, helper and spectators present at the competition.  Precautions should be taken to protect these people.  The throwing area should be roped off to keep spectators off the athletic field.  There should be some type of cage or backstop for the hammer throw.

               6.  If the judge has a doubt about calling a foul on a competitor then no foul should be called.

               7.  Communication to the judges, game specific judging rules such as:

                              a.  Truncating Rules.  Rounding up should never e used as this can award a distance longer then actually thrown.

                              b.  Non stand Tie Breaking Rules

                              c.  Methodology used for Passes on Height Events

               8.  Prize money will only be given to professional competitors.  Prize money will be determined by awarding money according to placing.  Amateur competitors shall not receive prize money for the events listed above.  They may receive compensation for travel expenses and other events competed in such as a Challenge Caber or Farmer’s Walk.

               9.  Drug testing of any competitors is left to the discretion and capabilities of each Games being competed in.  If a competitor is banned/suspended as a result of a drug test, they will not be allowed to compete until the ban/suspension is over.  Bans/suspensions from other sports will be enforced.  Competitors banned/suspended from another sport will not be allowed to compete in a game.

RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ATHLETE

 

               1.  Competitors banned/suspended from this or another sport will not be allowed to compete in a Games.

               2.  All athletes are responsible for treating their own injuries.  If the Athletic Director or Judge feels that any injury will not allow a competitor to compete safely, the competitor will be asked to leave the field.

               3.  Sportsmanship is expected.  This should not have to be stated.  Inappropriate conduct towards judges, volunteers, scorers and member of the audience ill not be tolerated and may subject the competitor to disqualification.

               4.  Throwers must wear appropriate footwear.

               5.  If a thrower chooses to use tacky or chalk, it is advisable for the thrower to bring their own since the games may not provide these items.  The competitor should be responsible for cleaning off any substance they have used for the next competitor.

               6.  If a thrower is unsure of a rule pertaining to their style, the judge should be consulted prior to an attempt.

               7.  This sport is inherently dangerous and it is every athlete’s responsibility to obey the rules and heed the judge’s rulings.

 

SCORING

 

               1.  The one-point scoring system will be used in all KASA Highland Games.  In this system a competitor receives points depending on placing in each contested event.  One point for a first place finish, two points for a second place and so on.  The competitor with the fewest accumulated points after all the events have been contested is the overall games winner of that class.